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An assortment of Python Libraries

Page history last edited by Dorai Thodla 13 years, 8 months ago

 

An Assortment of Python Libraries

Built on a portable AVL tree library written in C. (included) This module implements an interesting builtin data structure for Python that combines the search and store efficiency of a balanced binary tree with the convenience and characteristics of an array.

 

An extension module useful for parsing and unparsing binary data structures. Somewhat like the standard struct module, but with a few extra features (bitfields, user-function-fields, byte order specification, etc…) and a different API more convenient for streamed and context-sensitive formats like network protocol packets, image and sound files, etc…

 

A syslog module implemented in Python. A little more flexible than the C version by Lance Ellinghouse, this one implements the syslog ‘protocol’ directly, and can log to remote hosts.

 

A simple, powerful framework for building custom SPAM filters. SpamWall is a filtering proxy daemon that sits between your site’s SMTP server and the outside world. It is modular and extensible. Included are two sample filters - a regular-expression based filter (like procmail) and a ‘blacklist’ filter.

 

# Asynchronous Sockets Library

A library for building asynchronous socket clients and servers. A single program can ’simultaneously’ communicate with many other clients and servers, using and implementing multiple protocols, all running within a single address space, on a single thread. Sound like magic? Nah, it’s just event-driven multiplexing. It’s such a neat idea, that it’s gotten its own ‘pattern name’: Reactor. Douglas C. Schmidt has written a paper on this, you can find it on his Design Patterns for Concurrent, Parallel, and Distributed Systems page. (No, I didn’t invent the idea. I stole it from INN!)

 

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